Spot the hyperbole

Here’s my weekend reading. What’s yours?

#fridayreads #books #reading

No. Not scrolling, thanks.

I think this picture captures the Frontback app perfectly

Via lettersofnote

That kind of Monday.

#music #Monday #chromecast

… Oh, OK, THAT Stephen King.  ???

#books

#quiet #introvert

In today’s mail. Some good buzz about this book

#books #bees


Recommended Viewing: Artist Todd Spence has drawn True Detective as a series of Hardy Boys novels. Pair with: Our essay on what female detective novels to read after True Detective.

My new favorite thing of the day. via millionsmillions


Recommended Viewing: Artist Todd Spence has drawn True Detective as a series of Hardy Boys novels. Pair with: Our essay on what female detective novels to read after True Detective.

My new favorite thing of the day. via millionsmillions

theatlantic:

Confusing Math Homework? Don’t Blame the Common Core

“I hate the Common Core,” the mother of two complained when I told her I write about education.

“What, specifically, do you hate?” I asked.

“The math. It makes no sense! I can’t help my kid with his homework and I don’t understand the new methods at all.”

What I told this mother, and what I wish I could explain to every parent frustrated with the nonsensical math homework coming home in our children’s backpacks, is this: The confusing math methodology everyone is complaining about is not part of the Common Core State Standards.

The Common Core is a set of “standards,” lists of competencies or skills that kids will need to know by the end of a given school year. Standards require what skills will be taught, while curriculum dictates other details such as how a given skill is conveyed to a second grader. For example, the Standards require second graders to know that “100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens—called a ‘hundred,’” but curriculum dictates the textbook, or teaching methodology, or philosophy used to teach that skill. The confusing math that has been coming home in our children’s backpacks is a result of Everyday Math, a curriculum based on critical thinking skills, (so-called “fuzzy math”) developed at the University of Chicago.

Read more. [Image: Patrick Giblin/Flickr]

Books in today’s mail -

#books

winkbooks:

The art and revelations of hand-drawn maps
From Here to Thereby Kris HarzinskiPrinceton Architectural Press2010, 224 pages, 5 x 7.4 x .09$13 Buy a copy on Amazon
Google maps are unsurpassed for convenience and scale. Lost in this modern marvel is the unleashed personality of a hand-drawn map. Not too long ago, in order to get to a friend’s house, or to find a cool restaurant, someone would need to draw you a map on a scrap of paper. That sketched map was an abstraction, a distillation that said almost as much about the drawer as about the location. Each person compresses reality differently. The thickness of a line, the size of lettering, what they ignore vs what they emphasize — all reveal their person, and on paper, this revelation is always a surprise. Besides directions, these charts were sheets of folk art. Recognizing their vanishing beauty, Kris Harzinski began collecting these throw-away hand-drawn maps. He also collected hand-drawn maps of imaginary places. He created a Hand Drawn Map Association, and funneled 200 of the more curious maps into this tome. This is not a coffee table book (although it could have been), but a modest paperback that works as a reminder and inspiration. – Kevin Kelly winkbooks:

The art and revelations of hand-drawn maps
From Here to Thereby Kris HarzinskiPrinceton Architectural Press2010, 224 pages, 5 x 7.4 x .09$13 Buy a copy on Amazon
Google maps are unsurpassed for convenience and scale. Lost in this modern marvel is the unleashed personality of a hand-drawn map. Not too long ago, in order to get to a friend’s house, or to find a cool restaurant, someone would need to draw you a map on a scrap of paper. That sketched map was an abstraction, a distillation that said almost as much about the drawer as about the location. Each person compresses reality differently. The thickness of a line, the size of lettering, what they ignore vs what they emphasize — all reveal their person, and on paper, this revelation is always a surprise. Besides directions, these charts were sheets of folk art. Recognizing their vanishing beauty, Kris Harzinski began collecting these throw-away hand-drawn maps. He also collected hand-drawn maps of imaginary places. He created a Hand Drawn Map Association, and funneled 200 of the more curious maps into this tome. This is not a coffee table book (although it could have been), but a modest paperback that works as a reminder and inspiration. – Kevin Kelly winkbooks:

The art and revelations of hand-drawn maps
From Here to Thereby Kris HarzinskiPrinceton Architectural Press2010, 224 pages, 5 x 7.4 x .09$13 Buy a copy on Amazon
Google maps are unsurpassed for convenience and scale. Lost in this modern marvel is the unleashed personality of a hand-drawn map. Not too long ago, in order to get to a friend’s house, or to find a cool restaurant, someone would need to draw you a map on a scrap of paper. That sketched map was an abstraction, a distillation that said almost as much about the drawer as about the location. Each person compresses reality differently. The thickness of a line, the size of lettering, what they ignore vs what they emphasize — all reveal their person, and on paper, this revelation is always a surprise. Besides directions, these charts were sheets of folk art. Recognizing their vanishing beauty, Kris Harzinski began collecting these throw-away hand-drawn maps. He also collected hand-drawn maps of imaginary places. He created a Hand Drawn Map Association, and funneled 200 of the more curious maps into this tome. This is not a coffee table book (although it could have been), but a modest paperback that works as a reminder and inspiration. – Kevin Kelly winkbooks:

The art and revelations of hand-drawn maps
From Here to Thereby Kris HarzinskiPrinceton Architectural Press2010, 224 pages, 5 x 7.4 x .09$13 Buy a copy on Amazon
Google maps are unsurpassed for convenience and scale. Lost in this modern marvel is the unleashed personality of a hand-drawn map. Not too long ago, in order to get to a friend’s house, or to find a cool restaurant, someone would need to draw you a map on a scrap of paper. That sketched map was an abstraction, a distillation that said almost as much about the drawer as about the location. Each person compresses reality differently. The thickness of a line, the size of lettering, what they ignore vs what they emphasize — all reveal their person, and on paper, this revelation is always a surprise. Besides directions, these charts were sheets of folk art. Recognizing their vanishing beauty, Kris Harzinski began collecting these throw-away hand-drawn maps. He also collected hand-drawn maps of imaginary places. He created a Hand Drawn Map Association, and funneled 200 of the more curious maps into this tome. This is not a coffee table book (although it could have been), but a modest paperback that works as a reminder and inspiration. – Kevin Kelly

winkbooks:

The art and revelations of hand-drawn maps

From Here to There
by Kris Harzinski
Princeton Architectural Press
2010, 224 pages, 5 x 7.4 x .09
$13 Buy a copy on Amazon

Google maps are unsurpassed for convenience and scale. Lost in this modern marvel is the unleashed personality of a hand-drawn map. Not too long ago, in order to get to a friend’s house, or to find a cool restaurant, someone would need to draw you a map on a scrap of paper. That sketched map was an abstraction, a distillation that said almost as much about the drawer as about the location. Each person compresses reality differently. The thickness of a line, the size of lettering, what they ignore vs what they emphasize — all reveal their person, and on paper, this revelation is always a surprise. Besides directions, these charts were sheets of folk art. Recognizing their vanishing beauty, Kris Harzinski began collecting these throw-away hand-drawn maps. He also collected hand-drawn maps of imaginary places. He created a Hand Drawn Map Association, and funneled 200 of the more curious maps into this tome. This is not a coffee table book (although it could have been), but a modest paperback that works as a reminder and inspiration. – Kevin Kelly